The Slums of Derby

early-postcard-willow-row-old-derby
Willow Row, Old Derby

If you lived in the West End of Derby in the 19th century, you were considered to live in the slums.  It is here that the families I’ve researched lived mainly in what was known as court housing (see Discover Liverpool for a good explanation of this type of housing).

An article on the Derby Telegraph site mentions that this area was part of an 1849 report to the General Board of Health on “The Sewerage, Drainage and Supply of Water and the Sanitary Conditions of the Inhabitants of Derby”;

 In Willow Row, Court 1, 103 inhabitants shared two privies and residents reported that milk would turn to curd when mixed with water from the communal pump…

Observations of Walker Lane, where 75 cases of typhus fever were reported between June 15 and September 14, 1847, were: “The houses are of the most inferior description and the inhabitants of a piece with their houses; to crown all, there are lodging houses, which are the principal headquarters of vagrants, and of those comers and goers who, for reasons best known to themselves, prefer darkness to light.”

Model of Court Housing via National Museums Liverpool

It is in these conditions that Hannah Bates, William Lamb (& their families) lived most of their lives.  The slum clearances of the 1930s mean that the court housing is now long gone but it’s important to keep these living conditions in mind when researching the people of the area and trying to understand their lives.

derbymap
2016 map of Derby (old street layout  in black)

 

 

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22 thoughts on “The Slums of Derby

  1. Hello – I’m interested in learning more about the old West End of Derby and the slum clearances of the 1960s. Do you have any information. In particular, Goodwin Street, Chapel Street and Brook Street. Thanks, Tom

  2. Hi Tom,
    I, too, am interested in learning more but unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be a lot of information available (not online at least). When I was at the Derby Local Studies Library last year, one of the (very helpful) workers there seemed to have knowledge on this subject so if you’re nearby you could ask there.
    All I know is in this post (and the links) but I’m particularly interested in Goodwin Street as well so please let me know if you find out anything!

  3. I was born in little Watson Street in 1941 that was a slum but goodwin st willow row was even worse that is what we were led to believe all of westernd was a slum but still got nice memories
    Norman
    Bexon

    • Hi, I live on Watson Street, 52 to be exact. (I am leaving soon so I don’t mind who knows) I was born here.
      I have always wondered what it was like to live here back then. I think one of the occupants of my house in particular had a decent amount of money and good jobs. They acquired my neighbors house and made it into one large house. My bathroom was also fitted quite early on in the houses history. My house was extended with 2 floors at some point around 1920 (I assume by the better off family) at which point a bathroom was fitted. My house and my neighbors house are 2 separate dwellings again, I am not sure when this occurred.

      However, before this, it used to be a shop, but they went bankrupt in the early 1900’s (acquired from the newspaper archives) during the time it was a shop it was a 4 room house (including the shop area + an outhouse) there was a girl living here, she was 25, working in the mill as a tape weaver and looking after her niece and nephew there was also a lodger there may have been someone else here, I can’t recall. In comparison to some of the houses in this area I don’t think it would have been that bad. Obviously, I cant say for sure.

      We still have the old gas pipes in the attic which would have lit the house.

      When we moved in 26 years ago, the old toilet was in the shed too 🙂 I love my house, it’s history and the area, I will miss it very much.

  4. My grandparents had a public house in Quarn Street, the Quarn Tavern, near Chadwicks Chip Shop and Mrs Powell’s corner shop. There was another corner shop Bridges and a Betting Shop. A few family names I remember, Castledine, Mosley, Donlon, Goffey, Tassell, Scattergood the Butcher, Billy Upton had a toy shop on Kedleston Road, I remember the West End as an old area with entry ways, deep guttered and blue bricked pavements but not a slum. I remember my grandparents had a TV and most of the neighbours came in to watch the Coronation. There was also a Street party, my grandfather supplying large jugs of beer. There was a modern toilet block in the backyard and two out of use brew houses. The pub formerly owned before my Grandfather by a Johnny Ayres a Melbourne brewer, they use to brew at the Quarn Tavern too. The brewer then was a guy Mr. Mason I met him years later when an old man. My grandmother would walk to Derby market or catch a trolley bus, often go along to Mad Harry a market trader in the Morledge? We often walked her mini- dachshund and spaniels to Markeaton Park eyeing up the Matchbox toy cars in Billy Uptons shop window or calling in to Scattergoods the Butchers to feed the goldfish he kept in large tanks around his shop.

    • Allan. It was George Upton who owned the hardware store on Kedleston Road. He was my great uncle (my grandmother was Amy Upton before she married my grandad and then became Amy Smith. They lived at 40 Walter Street). My other great uncle was Jim Upton who had a builder’s yard off Leyland Street. I also remember the Scattergoods. I went to school with the stepdaughter of one of them. Sadly, neither my uncle George’s shop, nor Scattergood’s butchers are there any longer.

    • Thank you for your memory, Allan. From what you’ve written, ‘Clearing the slums’ in the 1930s obviously led to better living conditions for future residents.
      Was the ‘modern toilet block’ for the use of the whole street?
      I’m also curious about the brew houses as another LAMB ran The Shamrock on Goodwin Street (circa 1870s) which I think was probably brewed at home or on the premises.

      • I haven’t heard of a Shamrock Pub on Goodwin Street? My family ran The Duke of Devonshire Inn on the corner of Goodwin and Wright Street.

        • I’ve been meaning to make a post about ‘The Shamrock’ – I guess the time is now!
          In which time period did your family run ‘The Duke of Devonshire Inn’?

          edit: post is now up

          Funnily enough, while writing that post I came across a mention of the Duke of Devonshire in one of the newspapers 🙂

  5. Allan, my family lived at 41 Quarn street, next to the bookies, opposite The Quarn as I remember it.
    We lived there from 1950 to 1961
    My mum used to stand on the step of the pub, with half a pint of beer so she could watch the house. Our house was never a slum, we did have an outside toilet for a while but we then had the loft converted into a bathroom / toilet a few years before we moved. We never had a lot of money though, our clothes were from jumble sales, but my dad worked every hour God sent, having 5 jobs at one time, and we always he’d food on the table. Our name was Windsor, my mum and dad were Walter and Phyllis, my sister was Christine my brothers James and Mark.
    I remember Mrs Powell well, never happy. My mum spent a lot of time in hospital, if it hadn’t been for the neighbours we would have had to go into a home.
    Hard times I must admit, but no slum on Quarn street. Heather x

    • Thank you for this, Heather.
      I imagine the area was much improved in the 1950s from what is what like before the clearances in the 1930s. Having an indoor toilet must’ve felt so luxurious. 🙂

  6. Hi We lived Parker St our house was always kept clean & tidy. Windows, step and sill done every sat morning. My dad decorated on a regular basis. I went in and out of many house’s of friends and neighbours who’s home’s were the same. There was 7 children 2 adults and a greyhound in a 3 bedroom no bathroom house. Loo in the yard. My great grandad brewed beer for the Woodlark, Ram & Maypole. Judith x

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